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About Betsy Kopor

My legal name is Elizabeth but please call me Betsy. 

Elizabeth Kopor, LPC Intern Supervised by Andrew Gill, LPC-S   Betsy also has a MA in Counseling.

From 1999 to 2019, Betsy was the Founder, Manager, and Counselor at Rachel Ministries in Fort Worth.  During those 20 years she provided pastoral counseling to groups and individuals, as well as aftercare programs to help trauma victims of abortion, miscarriage, rape, sexual, emotional, and physical abuse. Many had diagnoses such as  PTSD, depression, anxiety, panic disorder, addiction problems, and bereavement. She also helped the overwhelmed, burnt out, and emotionally exhausted regain their strength and balance.   < These are Betsy's areas of expertise.  If you can't make it into the office, Betsy also provides telehealth counseling.  

A Statement from Betsy

After 20 years of ministry service I've discerned to retire from managing a large ministry and continue my ministry work as a LPC Intern under Andrew Gill, LPC-S.  I have been preparing my whole life for this season to help others without the clutter of running a large ministry and I feel privileged that God is continuing to use me.  I want you to know that with me as your counselor you have a safe place to privately share everything that is important to you.  I provide spiritual and psychological help for men and women, in a safe, confidential, and non-judgmental setting.  Since I ran a Post Abortion Ministry for 20 years I am very experienced in providing those interventions.

In addition to her extensive counseling experience, Betsy has presented at national and local conferences to the general public, clergy, and licensed mental health professionals.  She has been interviewed on Christian television and radio.  Betsy also has extensive experience as an event planner producing marathon healing retreats, Christian plays, and conferences.  She marketed Rachel Ministries through social media, print, and radio commercials (which she wrote).  Betsy holds a Master of Arts in Professional Counseling, Passed the National Counselor Exam and is an LPC Intern.  She is also a member of the American Association of Christian Counselors and the North Central Texas Counseling Association.   

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Licensed Professional Counselors

In Texas, there are 3 levels of Licensing for  Licensed Professional Counselors.  They are:  Licensed Professional Counselor - Intern, Licensed Professional Counselor, Licensed Professional Counselor - Supervisor

All 3 LPC levels have years of study, but are not students because they have at least a Master’s degree in counseling or a similar degree in Psychology or Social Work. They have passed the  National Counselor Examination and been issued a corresponding license by the Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors. 

The Licensed Professional Counselor-Intern is authorized by the state of Texas to provide the exact same Counseling Methods and Practices as a Licensed Professional Counselor.  One difference is that Licensed Professional Counselor-Interns counseling services under the supervision of a Licensed Professional Counselor who is a Board Certified Supervisor.  Elizabeth Kopor MA, Licensed Professional Counselor-Intern is supervised by Andrew Gill MA, LPC-S, LCDC.  Andrew is a Board Certified Supervisor.  Click here to see Andrew''s web page.  LPC-Interns  meet regularly with their supervisor to review the LPC Interns cases.  A LPC Intern is not paid by insurance companies. Therefore, your health information is not reported to insurance companies. Betsy's Fee schedule.

The use of specific methods, techniques, or modalities within the practice of professional counseling is limited to professional counselors appropriately trained and competent in the use of such methods, techniques, or modalities. Authorized counseling methods, techniques and modalities may include, but are not restricted to, the following:

(1) individual counseling which uses interpersonal, cognitive, cognitive-behavioral, behavioral, psychodynamic, and affective methods and strategies to achieve mental, emotional, physical, social, moral, educational, career, and spiritual development and adjustment through the life span;

(2) group counseling which uses interpersonal, cognitive, cognitive-behavioral, behavioral, psychodynamic, and affective methods and strategies to achieve mental, emotional, physical, social, moral, educational, spiritual, and career development and adjustment through the life span;

(3) marriage/couples counseling which uses interpersonal, cognitive, cognitive-behavioral, behavioral, psychodynamic, affective and family systems methods and strategies to achieve resolution of problems associated with cohabitation and interdependence of adults living as couples;

(4) family counseling which uses interpersonal, cognitive, cognitive-behavioral, behavioral, psychodynamic, affective and family systems methods and strategies with families to achieve mental, emotional, physical, moral, social, educational, spiritual, and career development and adjustment through the life span;

(5) addictions counseling which uses interpersonal, cognitive, cognitive-behavioral, behavioral, psychodynamic, affective methods and strategies, and 12-step methods to achieve abstinence from the addictive substances and behaviors by the client;

(6) rehabilitation counseling which uses interpersonal, cognitive, cognitive-behavioral, behavioral, psychodynamic, and affective methods and strategies to achieve adjustment to a disabling condition and to reintegrate the individual into the mainstream of society;

(7) education counseling which uses formal and informal counseling methods and assessments and appraisal instruments for the purpose of determining strength, weakness, mental condition, emotional stability, intellectual ability, interest, skill, aptitude, achievement, and other personal characteristics of individuals for the selection of and placement in educational settings, preschool through postdoctoral study;

(8) career development counseling which uses formal and informal counseling methods and appraisal instruments for the purpose of determining intellectual ability, interest, skill, aptitude, achievement, mental condition, emotional fitness, and other personal characteristics for occupational, vocational, and career selection and placement throughout the life span;

(9) sexual issues counseling which uses interpersonal, cognitive, cognitive-behavioral, behavioral, psychodynamic, and affective methods and strategies in the resolution of sexual disorders;

(10) referral counseling which uses the processes of evaluating and identifying needs of clients to determine the advisability of referral to other specialists, informing the client of such judgment and communicating as requested or deemed appropriate to such referral sources;

(11) psychotherapy which uses interpersonal, cognitive, cognitive-behavioral, behavioral, psychodynamic, and affective methods and/or strategies to assist clients in their efforts to recover from mental or emotional issues;

(12) play therapy which uses play and play media as the child's natural medium of self-expression, and verbal tracking of the child's play behaviors and feelings as a part of the therapist's role in helping children overcome their social, emotional, and behavioral issues;

(13) hypnotherapy which uses the principles of hypnosis and post-hypnotic suggestion in the treatment of mental and emotional issues and addictions;

(14) expressive modalities used in the treatment of interpersonal, emotional or mental health issues, chemical dependency, or human developmental issues. Modalities include but are not limited to, music, art, dance movement, or the use of techniques employing animals in providing treatment;

(15) biofeedback which uses electronic equipment to monitor and provide feedback regarding an individual's physiological responses. The counselor who uses biofeedback must be able to prove academic preparation and supervision in the use of the equipment as a part of the counselor's academic program or the substantial equivalent provided through approved continuing education;

(16) assessing and appraising, in compliance with §681.43 of this title (relating to Testing), which uses formal and informal instruments and procedures, for which the counselor has received appropriate training and supervision, in individual and group settings for the purposes of determining the client's strengths and weaknesses, mental status, emotional stability, intellectual ability, interests, aptitudes, achievement level and other characteristics for diagnosing mental health disorders; but does not permit the diagnosis of a physical condition or physical disorder;

(17) consulting which uses the application of specific principles and procedures in counseling to provide assistance in understanding and solving current or potential problems that the consultee may have in relation to a third party, whether individuals, groups, or organizations but not considered direct client contact for LPC Interns; and

(18) crisis counseling which focuses on short term counseling interventions to address immediate situations including factors such as safety and immediate needs.

Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor

A CI is a LCDC InternBetsy is a CI.

A Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor is licensed to provide chemical dependency treatment services involving the application of principles, methods and procedures of the chemical dependency profession. We help clients develop an understanding of their chemical dependency problems, define goals, and implement treatment strategies. More specifically LCDCs provide:

Screening-This is the initial evaluation stage, during which a potential client's physiological, psychological, and social symptoms of substance abuse are evaluated. The client’s need and eligibility for treatment are assessed, and based on these and other factors, I decide whether or not the client is appropriate for treatment or referral. I look for any coexisting conditions (medical, psychiatric, physical) that indicate the need for additional professional assessments or services. During the screening process, I explain all applicable laws.

Intake- This can be seen as an extension of the screening stage. During this process, I obtain all appropriately signed consents and complete all the legally required documents.

Orientation- These first three core functions of addiction counseling may not be exact in order; the orientation stage may take place before, during, or after the screening and intake stages. The main goal of orientation is to familiarize the client with the general rules and goals of the counseling process, and what the client can and should expect over the course of treatment.

Assessment- This is when the counselor works with the client to gather his history, relating but not limited to any problems with substance abuse. This information-gathering can take the form of interviews, testing, and a review of patient records. As a LPC-S, I make a diagnosis and explain the assessment results to the client.

Treatment Planning- Now I explain the assessment results and identify and rank the problems that are in need of resolution, and discuss in the written treatment plan an appropriate treatment process. We formulate agreed upon short and long term goals using behavioral terms.

Counseling- The counselor assists his patient by examining the patient’s actions and problems, and by helping the patient see the consequences of his substance abuse and destructive behaviors. The counselor also works with his client to come up with solutions that the patient can agree to and be held accountable for and, together, the two implement their treatment plan.

Case Management- This core function of counseling brings the various parties and resources together for the purpose of coordinating services for the client. After a treatment plan has been established, the gathered resources come together to help meet the patient’s needs as mapped out in the treatment plan. Basically, coordinate services for client care.

Crisis Intervention- Of all the substance abuse counselor roles, this one may be the most intermittent. It involves taking immediate action in response to any serious or crucial crises that come up during the course of treatment. Implement an immediate course of action appropriate to the crisis.

Client Education- It’s part of the counselor’s responsibility to present relevant substance abuse information to the client and to other groups who may also have issues with substance abuse. These resources should also be aimed at informing and educating the general public, and letting them know what resources and services are available.

Referral- Over the course of the other core functions of addiction counseling, it’s likely that a patient will express certain problems and needs that cannot be met by his counselor. When that happens, the counselor should assist the client in matching his needs to the appropriate resource, such as a different counselor or treatment program. The counselor would identify client needs they can't meet, explain the rationale for the referral to the client, match the client needs to the appropriate resources, and assist the client in making the transition.

Reports and Record Keeping- As with most jobs, it’s important to document the administration and results of assessments and treatment. Counselors are responsible for taking notes, writing reports, and keeping track of other data relating to each patient.

Consultation with Other Professionals in Regard to Client Treatment- When counselors recognize issues that are beyond their knowledge, skills or abilities, they consult with knowledgeable resources to ensure the provision of effective treatment services. By consulting with other professionals and peers, counselors can ensure that the patient has been provided with the best and most thorough care and treatment.

LCDC'S Scope of Practice.

An LCDC is authorized to provide chemical dependency counseling services involving the application of the principles, methods, and procedures of the chemical dependency profession as defined by the profession's ethical standards . The license does not qualify an individual to provide services outside this scope of practice.

The scope of practice for an LCDC includes services that address substance abuse/dependence and/or its impact on the service recipient subject to the following:

The focus of an LCDC’s services shall be on assisting individuals or groups to develop an understanding of chemical dependency problems, define goals, and plan action reflecting the individual's or group's interest, abilities, and needs, as affected by claimed or indicated chemical dependency problems; and

Master of Arts in Professional Counseling

Betsy holds a Master of Arts in Professional Counseling. This provides the education to work with individuals, couples, families and groups in community, social service, religious and private practice settings. The therapist who achieves a Master of Arts in Professional Counseling will be able to: demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the functional areas of professional counseling, apply critical thinking skills in developing a framework for counseling diverse client populations, understand the ethical issues in mental health and related settings, they also have the ability to conduct relevant research appropriate to the discipline. 

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LOCATION

Appointment Times

Monday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

9:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed